The Digital Age Explored: Brighton Digital Festival

The past is another country, so a famous quote goes. This has always been true, but never more so than in the 21st century. Our lives have changed almost unrecognisably in the past 20 years, as we move into the Digital Era and embrace the benefits it has to offer.

The Brighton Digital Festival is a month-long event embracing all that the switch from analogue to digital lives offers. Not only does the festival look to showcase the Brighton-based talent in this sphere, it also looks to examine the way that the internet is now shaping existences and experiences.

The World Is Online

When the internet first went mainstream, it was a luxury. Few people had it; you might have had an email address, but you had precious few friends and family you could send email to.

Now, the internet is a necessity. In fact, the UN has declared that internet access is a bonafide human right. This was unthinkable back when we were all connecting via a torturously long dial-up process and our phones were used to make phone calls and little else.

It’s almost impossible to run life today with access to the internet. Who would have thought that we would one day be able to do all of our banking online, talk to friends via instant messengers, even indulge our passion for live roulette in the UK by playing online without ever having to set foot in a casino. Our lives are now easier to manage as a result, but such a cultural shift is not without its complications.

The Digital Festival seeks to embrace this change, but also to examine the impact of digital culture and the business opportunities that have sprung forth as a result. Across over 190 different events, the festival is well placed to examine all of these innovations.

Brighton Embracing The Digital World

Brighton has always led the way when it comes to understanding the new digital world. BrightonSEO — the biggest SEO conference of its kind in the world — has recently been held, and the Digital Festival will follow hot on its heels.

To date, a number of exciting events are scheduled, including a live podcast about digital culture, an opportunity to create your own terrarium, as well as an exhibition of public artwork destined for the Huxley Building. There’s plenty to see if you decide to attend, but it’s also worth considering how you might want to contribute your own ideas.

Uniquely, the festival runs in an open-source manner, giving people the access to a platform to discuss their ideas or showcase their ability. Anyone who has a perspective or take on the way in which digital culture has influenced lives is afforded the space to discuss it, whether it be in a positive or negative manner.

If you want to explore the digital world in detail and see some of the latest creative developments in the pipeline, then visiting the festival should be high on your to-do list. It runs from September 14th right through to October 13th at locations throughout the city.