Once again Brighton Fashion Week brought the best of cutting edge design to venues across the city. BN1’s Natalie Heath and David Smith were there to capture just a few of the special moments at the Sustain catwalk show.

A heady mix of perfumes filled the air as I waited in the queue amongst a throng of topknots and red lipstick for Hove’s All Saints Church to open its doors. The fashionistas and I were waiting for the Sustain Catwalk show to start, the much anticipated opening show of Brighton Fashion Week.

Once inside I was enchanted by the beauty of the grandiose building. The huge pointed arches were lit by purple up lighters and the words Brighton Fashion Week projected on the runway. Supported by the World Fair Trade Organisation, this year’s theme was all about sustainability, and each designer had showcased a collection that was ethically produced and thought provoking.

With colourful, busy, floral prints, KellyDawn Riot’s beautiful menswear collection was reminiscent of 70’s flower power. Kelly aims is to create wearable art, and each design stems from her own illustrations, which are then painted in watercolour and transferred on to natural cottons and linens using sustainable dyes. The results are simply stunning.

I really enjoyed the Raggedy Rags collection by designer Hayley Trezise. A bold mix of tweeds, patchwork, braces, hats, flat shoes and stark lines provided an air of playfulness and non-conformity. Hayley’s creations use pre-loved textiles and feature her signature ‘scribblestitch’ detail. Her aim is to celebrate the female form whilst having minimum impact on the environment. Hayley wants to encourage women to ‘dress like nobody’s judging’.

Claire Poggio uses up-cycled, re-used and organic textiles to create her much loved collections. This one focused on bright coloured fabrics, often with cut outs filled with clear plastic. The same plastic was also used to create skirts over shorts, bags and capes. The collection was summery, sporty and feminine. Claire wants to highlight what can be created with unwanted or discarded materials.

I left the venue feeling very inspired and uplifted by what I had experienced. I was given some great ideas about re-using items in my own wardrobe that have not seen the light of day for years, breathing new life into them and creating fun new combinations with what I already have. The environmental impact from ‘throw away fashion’ is undeniably huge and if we can just open our minds to using old clothes in new ways we can save money, reduce our personal clothing waste and create ensembles that are as edgy, individual and unique as we are.

www.brightonfashionweek.com

Words and video by Natalie Heath
Images by www.photosbydavid.org